(Source: maplesurple)

I’ve told the kids in the ghettos that violence won’t solve their problems, but then they ask me, and rightly so; “Why does the government use massive doses of violence to bring about the change it wants in the world?” After this I knew that I could no longer speak against the violence in the ghettos without also speaking against the violence of my government.
Martin Luther King Jr. (via loveinfamine)

kikaijima:

a redditor recounts the day he met robin williams.

roughness:

robin williams was the crazy uncle you could always go to for a joke or a cheering up and it’s strange and very hard for me to fathom that he is gone. I just assumed that people like him, people who have changed others’ lives for the better and brought such joy and excitement to children and adults alike, would live eternally

sister-psychosis:

"What a lot of people fail to understand is that we never started this band as a career move anyway. We did it cos we were bored shitless and we were all on the dole."

The iPod, like the Walkman cassette player before it, allows us to listen to our music wherever we want. Previously, recording technology had unlinked music from the concert hall, the café, and the saloon, but now music can always be carried with us. Michael Bull, who has written frequently about the impact of the Walkman and the iPod, points out that we often use devices to ‘aestheticize urban space.’ We carry our own soundtrack with us wherever we go, and the world around us is overlaid with our music. Our whole life becomes a movie, and we can alter the score for it over and over again: one minute it’s a tragedy, and the next it’s an action film. Energetic, dreamy, or ominous and dark: everyone has their own private movie going on in their heads, and no two are the same….Theodor Adorno… called this situation ‘accompanied solitude,’ a situation where we might be alone, but we have the ability via music to create the illusion that we are not.
from How Music Works, by David Byrne (via 1800blergh)

(Source: girlfromtralfamadore)

(Source: criistian-23)

vk-oasismusic:

Int: In one interview you said your lyrics are meaningless. How did you mean that?

Noel: Well they all mean a lot to me, because I wrote them obviously. But I’m not one for…
Certain people who write songs will sit there and try to convince you that they have created the great art form. They love talking about themselves. I don’t particularly like talking about me .

I would never go around and say what a great guy I am, or I think I’m the best lyricist on and on. Regardless of what I think of those songs [I write] it’s meaningless. It doesn’t matter what I think of them.

What my songs mean to me is lots of kids queue up in the pouring rain the day the day a single comes out and buy it. That’s what it means to me.

It doesn’t matter what I think of my songs, it’s what you think. It’s more important than what I think because I’m not going to go out and buy the records.

Obviously I think they’re the greatest pieces of music ever recorded. But I’m not going to say this is the greatest song since ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ because it means, blah, blah blah, and that line means blah, blah, blah. I don’t really like talking about things like that.

somanybadcustomers:

If you’re rude to retail workers, there’s a 1000000000% chance they’re going to laugh and make fun of you after you leave.


liamrulesok:

Oasis play Knebworth 10th & 11th August 1996

The gig sold out within 6 minutes of going on sale.

It was the biggest gig ever played in Britain to that point, with about 125,000 people at each of the two nights, for a total of 250,000 fans in attendance, and had everyone who wanted a ticket gotten one, it would undoubtedly have been the biggest gig in all of history, and remained so indefinitely.

At least 1.8 million people applied for tickets… meaning that Oasis could have played Knebworth to 125,000 people every night for two weeks straight!

Knebworth House’s official website quotes the figure at 2.6 million, which would have seen the band play to 125,000 fans every night for THREE weeks straight!!

The show was carried live on radio stations from 34 different countries around the world, and the band earned £5.5 million from ticket sales alone (not including merchandise). They sold 150,000 t-shirts to the fans. People near the stage were actually in a different county than people at the very back of the audience, 2 1/4 miles away.

"From his side of the stage, Noel surveys the sea of bodies stretching from the barrier in front of him way back into the horizon. ‘This is history,’ he proclaims, visibly moved. ‘I thought it was Knebworth,’ Liam interjects."

-Was There Then, Jill Furmanovsky, 1997